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  • Writer's pictureMarinette

My first Doris dress, a Sew over it pattern

I am thrilled to be back behind my keyboard, to blog and discuss sewing patterns and projects with you all!


Today, I am writing about a new outfit that has become an all-time summer favourite: The Doris dress, a Sew over it pattern.


This is a pattern I bought years ago, and I am so glad I finally found the right fabric to pair it with: This floaty pattern combined with a light weight linen made the perfect dress to endure harsh temperatures this summer (can you guess I didn't stay in the UK this past July?!).


A woman with brown hair is wearing a white dress with small green and pink flowers. She is in a sunny garden surrounded by flowers, and is smiling at the camera.


The Doris dress' features

I've always loved the shape of the Doris dress, and have been obsessed by the beige & red polka dot version featured on Sew over it's website for years.


I find the shape of the skirt very interesting and flattering: this 'fluted panelled skirt' is not an A-line skirt, nor a circle one, but it has a beautiful drape and twirls amazingly well!


The bust pleats and floaty grown-on sleeves are not something I am used to sew or wear, but I was curious to try them. Although I am not convinced they are the most flattering features, they are incredibly comfortable!


The cinched waist is simple, but efficient to provide a feminine and retro-looking shape. And the buttons on the top is a lovely addition, something I rarely sew.





The pattern, the process, and the sewing

This pattern is advertised as an intermediate one, and I rather agree with this.

I wouldn't recommend it to beginners as some of the pieces can be a bit tricky (I am particularly thinking of the buttonhole closure at the centre front, the concealed zip, and the bust pleats.


As often when I first sew a new pattern, I didn't make any adjustments. However, now that I've done it once, I have ideas for the next one.


In particular, I am not sure I fully understand the use of the buttonholes at the front. Ths dress has a zip anyway, so why would we ever need another way to remove it? I think sewing actual buttonholes on the front panel is an overkill, and I will probably not bother next time (and simply sew buttons on top of the front panel).


Also, I think I'll slightly tweak the waist tie, to make it a bit larger and longer, so the bow in the back is a bit more elegant. And I usual, I'll have to lengthen the skirt a bit to make it more flattering for me!


A woman with brown hair is wearing a white dress with small green and pink flowers. She is in a sunny garden surrounded by flowers, and is looking down the floor while holding her hair




My version of the Doris dress

For this dress, I've used a very lightweight and flowy fabric I had never used before: a rayon linen from Dalston Mill Fabrics (you can still get it here).


The rayon ensures the dress has a great drape, and the linen makes it breathable and incredibly comfortable for hot days. This mix is also easier to sew than rayon on its own (which can be a bit slippery!).


Doris is advertised as 'the perfect summer’s day dress', and I have to say this description is pretty accurate. Especially with the fabric I used here. Indeed, I've worn it almost every day during our last vacation in Croatia, and it made me feel super stylish, despite the very hot temperatures.


A woman with brown hair is wearing a white dress with small green and pink flowers. She is in a sunny garden surrounded by flowers, and is smiling at the camera.




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